Uganda Honey

Honey in its purest

New journey about to begin…………………….

Lately there hasn’t been much activities here other than my regular training of beekeepers. Comes next month, my beekeeping adventure and journal will begin for the first time nearer to home, West Malaysia.

After a year of discussion and planning, the feasibility study of setting up a bee education centre at Kampung Temasek in Johor Bahru, Malaysia will begin. I had already began my ground work, arranging visits to bee farms, centres and making appointments to meet agriculturist at universities. In the process, I got to know some beekeepers in Malaysia as well. We had started to exchange notes and I am looking forward to visit their bee farm.

Azman Ali and his bees.

Azman and I began to share our passion mid of February this year and I am glad that I will soon be able to have a chance to see what beekeeping is about in Malaysia.

The species of honeybees that Azman is keeping is the one that I am keen to explore, Apis Cerenas. During my last two trips to Chiang Rai, North Thailand working with the Akhai tribes, there were also using the cerenas. Between the two, what I saw is that Azman is applying more of the modern method while the tribal folks are still keeping bees traditionally.

Azman's friend who is also a keen beekeeper.

Apis Cerenas are slightly more aggressive than the European bees. They are indigenous and I believe domesticating them would be a beneficial move for the local bee farmers. They can be captured from the wild.

I am really excited to travel back, closer to home to share what I had learned during my stay in Uganda.

After being a beekeeper, it had open up a whole new horizon and getting to know so many beekeepers out there who are playing their part in balancing the ecological system. I just hope that some beekeepers that had been mistreating these insects in the name of modernization will change their mindset and protect them rather than abusing them.

If you had read my previous post, you will find that such abusive skills are still being introduced in Uganda by these overseas commercial bee farmers coming here, highly paid by NGOs. One thing sad about the local farmers in Uganda is that they always felt that overseas bee professionals are always right. They do not dare to question.

A bee hive for education purposes.

I could still remember a few years back, a team of beekeepers from USA came and said they wanted to help the local community. Actually from the way I look at it, they were just simply using this idea to raise funds so that they can come for a nice holiday. They have no experience in African bees yet they tried to teach the local folks. They got the whole village running for cover when the colonies turned aggressive. After that incident, I don’t see them coming back or doing any follow ups anymore. It was a nice holiday trip for them and those who had funded their trip just simply did it blindly. A waste of resources.

Many honeybees are dying for no apparent reasons. I just wish that beekeepers must realize the seriousness and embark on natural beekeeping instead.

 

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June 21, 2011 Posted by | apiculture, bee colony, bee hive, beekeeping journal, beekeeping training | | 4 Comments